45: Water Birth

Water Birth

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Episode 45 Content and Overview

A water birth is a birth in which a baby is born to a mother laboring in a tub of water. There are legends of women in different cultures laboring in water dating back quite a ways but there isn’t documentation of anyone actually giving birth in water until 1803 in France. It wasn’t until the 1980’s that the popularity of water births began growing in Western cultures, and today it is becoming increasingly popular. Proponents of water birth claim that it is beneficial in management of discomfort from contractions, that it promotes relaxation, and that it eases stress for your baby during birth. Critics of the practice raise concerns about the safety of water births and risks associated with respiratory issues for the baby and the risk of infection for both you and your baby. This episode digs deep into both the possible benefits and risks.

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44: Birth Center

Birth Center

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Episode 44 Content and Overview

A birth center is a middle ground between a home birth and a hospital. You get the benefit of a natural birth in a home-like setting, with some of the safety net that you would have in a hospital. Birth centers are generally based on midwife led care, focused on prenatal and postpartum care for low-risk women. The majority of birth centers are free standing entities, and more are popping up in hospitals with the same focus of natural birth but are fully integrated within the hospital system in the event resources or care from the hospital are needed. This episode covers what a birth center is, what you can expect during your prenatal care, how everything works during your labor and birth, and the research on the safety of birth centers.

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Q&A: Placenta Previa

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Questions

“At week 28 I was diagnosed with a low-lying placenta. The midwife at this point of my pregnancy does not seem hopeful that it could move. However I have read a study that most women have the low-lying placenta issue resolve around 34 – 38 weeks. What do you know about low-lying placenta and the statistics on which weeks the placenta moved far enough?” -Margaret

“I am 13 weeks pregnant and was just diagnosed with complete placenta previa and I would really like to know more about it.  I am curious to know the risks at such an early stage of pregnancy as well as the later stages in pregnancy.” – Kylie

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43: Group B Strep

Group B Strep

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Episode 43 Content and Overview

Group B streptococcus is a type of bacterial infection. This bacterium naturally lives in the gastrointestinal tract and is present in the vagina and/or rectum of about 25% of all healthy, adult women. Once you have this bacterium it does not mean you will always have it, and it can come and go. Most women who are colonized with group B strep do not experience any symptoms, and normally this is not a big deal. It can create some complications for you when you are pregnant and has the potential to cause some serious complications if it is passed to your baby. It has become standard practice to test all expecting mothers between weeks 35 to 37 for group B strep. This episode covers what is involved in the testing, how group B strep is treated, and how you can reduce the risks to your baby. This episode also explores some research on what you can do to decrease your risk for group b strep during pregnancy and prevent the possibility of ever becoming colonized.

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Q&A: VBAC

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Question

“I’m pregnant with my second child. My first was a mixed position of breech and transverse, so I had a C-section. Even though this is my second, I feel like it’s my first since I never actually went into labor. I’d really like to have a VBAC this go around, but am curious about your opinion on how long I could go past my due date, and any risks involved besides the obvious rupture, or if you have any suggestions to increase my success of having a VBAC.” -Kelsey

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